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Author Topic: DitV2: New Rules!  (Read 15496 times)
lumpley
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« on: July 20, 2005, 06:03:23 AM »

The second edition upcoming has a new rule and a rule change in it. They're both about followup conflicts.

The rule change
I'm the GM. My NPCs take a stack of fallout, but nobody cares if they live or die or what.

How it used to work: I pass all their fallout dice, unrolled, to the players, to roll with their dice in the followup conflict.

How it works now: I roll their fallout dice as I would if we cared about them. However, instead of assigning fallout, I pass the two highest showing dice across to the players for their side of the followup conflict. They don't reroll them.

This is to make followup conflicts less humiliating for me as the GM.

The new rule
If you give instead when it's your turn to raise, you get to "cut your losses."

Take your highest single showing die and set it aside. After you roll your dice for the followup conflict, add the "cut your losses" die back into the mix, without rerolling it.

This is to break the thing where people are by default staying in every conflict past when they should be ditching out.

The relevant new text
Quote
Giving
When you Give instead of Seeing, you donít need to Take the Blow. In fact, one of the best reasons to Give is to avoid a Blow you canít bear to Take.   

Thereís no need to stay in a conflict to the bitter end. You can and should Give as soon as youíre willing to let the conflict go ó be it because the stakes arenít worth it, or because youíve thought of follow-up stakes even better ó or as soon as you realize you canít win.

When you Give instead of Raising, you get to cut your losses. Grab your highest showing single die and set it aside. If thereís any follow-up conflict, roll your Stat and Relationship dice as usual, then add this reserved die to the mix. Donít reroll it! This represents the advantage you keep by ceding the previous stakes on your own terms.

And later:
Quote
Follow-up Conflicts
A follow-up conflict is simply a new conflict that follows on the one just ended. In general you treat it exactly as you would any other, but it does have a few special considerations:

- It counts as a follow-up conflict only if its stakes follow directly from the previous conflictís resolution.

- Its stakes can be the same as the previous conflictís stakes only if all three of its participants, its stage as set, and its opening arena are different. That is, if your character tries to talk my character into admitting her sin, but fails, you canít just try again. That conflictís done. What you have to do if you want a follow-up with the same stakes is come back another time or catch her at some other place, with your friends to back you up ó and this time it canít be just talking.

- If you cut your losses in the previous conflict, Giving instead when it was your turn to Raise, you get to keep your single best die from that conflict. After you roll your dice for this conflict, add your reserved die (without rerolling it) to the mix.

- As the GM, I get an extra option, and itís a good one. If nobody cares about my NPCsí Fallout, when I roll my Fallout Dice, I don't calculate and choose Fallout. Instead, I simply give you the two highest dice to add into your side of the new conflict. You donít reroll them, just put them straight in with your own dice. Theyíre the advantage you carry into the follow-up.

Fairly minor but I figure you all should know.

-Vincent
« Last Edit: July 20, 2005, 06:05:57 AM by lumpley » Logged
Eric Provost
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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2005, 06:07:02 AM »

I definately like the rule change.  Handing the players a great big gob of falloutdice to whomp me with kinda sucked.  Will there be any guidelines as to which of the opposing players gets to take the two high dice?

The Cut Your Losses rule feels iffy.  I'm looking forward to trying it on for size.

-Eric
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bluegargantua
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2005, 08:38:35 AM »


  On the fallout issue:

  What happens if it's the GM vs. 2 or more players?  Who gets the dice?

  On the giving issue:

  GM: He clobbers you with a stone axe!
  Me: No way
  *rolling*
  GM: Hah!
  Me: Crap!
  *quick math*
  Me: OK, I give.

  So...I get clobbered with a stone axe then?  Kinda makes the bonus die pointless doesn't it? 

  Also, these Give dice are completely bonus right?  They don't subtract out of your regular die pools?  If I just give and give and give, can I build up a heinous pool of bonus dice to whomp on you?  I dunno if this is a valid strategy or not, I'm just pointing it out.

Interesting stuff
Tom

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Warren
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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2005, 08:42:20 AM »

I have to agree that handing over a whole bunch of Fallout to the players was a bit unbalancing. i.e. I had to hand over something like 18d8+6d6, IIRC, yesterday after a massive attack against a Sorceress, with a followup conflict of "do we exorcise the Demon out of her?" I had to Give, as there was no point facing that much. On reflection, I should have Gave earlier in the initial conflict, but you live and learn.

The thing which gets me is the two highest dice seems a pretty drastic reduction, and I'm sure my players would complain. I'll give it a go the next time we play, but I imagine that it might cause some problems. This is due to the fact that as soon as my players figured out the power of followups, they immediately started creating smaller (and thus more givable) conflicts, on the understanding that they would get a big bonus for the followup. Before they realised, the stakes they went for were always pretty 'big'.

Ah, well, I like the idea, but I'm not sure of the details... I'll let you know how it turns out.


« Last Edit: July 20, 2005, 09:03:38 AM by Warren » Logged
Warren
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2005, 08:52:43 AM »

  GM: He clobbers you with a stone axe!
  Me: No way
  *rolling*
  GM: Hah!
  Me: Crap!
  *quick math*
  Me: OK, I give.

  So...I get clobbered with a stone axe then?  Kinda makes the bonus die pointless doesn't it? 

Well, you didn't specify the Stakes in that example, but I'd presume that no, you wouldn't get hit by the axe if you Gave. If the stakes were, say, "Do I stop the bandit leaving town", and the GM raised a hit with a stone axe, then I could "Give" and not get hit with the axe, but the bandit gets away. If I gave on my Raise, then I guess I'd get the bonus die in the followup conflict of "Do I stop the bandit reaching the next town?"

  Also, these Give dice are completely bonus right?  They don't subtract out of your regular die pools?  If I just give and give and give, can I build up a heinous pool of bonus dice to whomp on you?  I dunno if this is a valid strategy or not, I'm just pointing it out.

I guess it's a maximum of one bonus die, total. If I Give and followup, I get the highest die from my remaining pool in my followup. If I Give that conflict, then I just get the highest die from whatever state my pool is now in (which could be the same bonus die, or any other you had left.)
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lumpley
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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2005, 08:56:14 AM »

Hey Tom!

Fallout: I dunno, that was unspecified in the old rules too. Whoever jumps for 'em, I'd think. Whoever landed the worst blow, maybe. Whoever invokes 'em first in the next conflict? That'd work.

Giving: Yeah, if the stakes are "killed in the head with an axe," maybe you don't want to give, even for the die. If you do give on your raise, you get your best die to go into the medical aid conflict, though.

People should always be looking at their dice like *quick math*, and if they aren't going to win, they should be going "escalate? give? escalate? give?" This rule is to encourage that.

The die is a bonus, yes, but as Warren says - you only get the one die and only for the one next conflict. There's no way to build up a pool.

Warren: Let me know how it goes.

Did your players really not care whether the sorceress lived or died?
 
-Vincent
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Joshua Patterson
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« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2005, 09:01:08 AM »

Fallout: I dunno, that was unspecified in the old rules too. Whoever jumps for 'em, I'd think. Whoever landed the worst blow, maybe. Whoever invokes 'em first in the next conflict? That'd work.


Having never played DitV (running it this weekend) I kinda like the idea of me as the GM setting the fallout dice on the table then letting the players roll for a followup conflict and deciding who needs what dice.  It's just another choice that I as a GM would be making in a typical RPG that I can pass off to my players.
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- Joshua Patterson
Warren
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« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2005, 09:08:15 AM »

Did your players really not care whether the sorceress lived or died?

Well, two of the three Dogs did. One decided that she was just worth pumping full of lead, just to be on the safe side. The other two started talking, but when the guns came out (the sorceress was unarmed), they joined in too.

There was quite a nifty conflict in the end, as when I Gave for the exorcism, I just let the Fallout dice go onto the girl, who then the Dogs had to dive in and rescue. They just about manged to do so, as well, so they are feeling quite proud of themselves, somewhat strangely.)

Off the top of my head Fallout suggestion: What about the GM rolls the fallout as suggested, but instead of passing back the two highest dice, only those dice that rolled maximum get passed back to the players, which can be rerolled into their pool as before?
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lumpley
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« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2005, 09:18:33 AM »

The "highest two" rule satisfies me on a mechanical, a procedural, and a symmetrical level; I'm not really looking for suggestions.

I should be clear: the existing fallout rule isn't bad or broken at all, it's just let me personally down a few times. Keep playing by it if that's what your group wants to do, I fully support.

(Warren, I think you may want to be giving fallout to your NPCs more often than you are, instead of giving those dice to the players. Under either rule. That's for a new thread, though, if you feel like it.)

-Vincent

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Darren Hill
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2005, 10:21:27 AM »

The Rule Change: as it happens, I've been using this exact rule myself, so I'm all for it :)
The New Rule: I look forward to giving it a try.
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Matt Wilson
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« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2005, 10:07:13 PM »

I likes these changes and things, I does!
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Ginger Stampley
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2005, 02:39:19 AM »

I look forward to trying these out with my group. It hasn't come up that much to date in the group I GM because of the way we've done things. But with the group I play in, many dice of fallout ended up our hands after a gunfight. I think we were more reckless in the followups because of that.
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mataglap
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« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2005, 11:24:58 AM »

It seems necessary but not explictly stated that the "cut your losses" die is the highest rolled whether it's been used or not.  True?

--Nathan
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lumpley
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« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2005, 11:33:55 AM »

Nope. Highest unused.

-Vincent
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mataglap
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« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2005, 12:21:50 PM »

It's probably just me, but I have a hard time understanding that from the text you've posted.  Is this supposed to be played against the ability of the PCs to bring in more dice via traits, relationships, and escalation?

--Nathan
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