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46709 Posts in 5588 Topics by 13297 Members Latest Member: - Shane786 Most online today: 38 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: IAWA Q's  (Read 1540 times)
Valvorik
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Posts: 114


« on: January 14, 2008, 12:20:12 PM »

Owe list striking for advantage dice (page 19 and then 23) - it is correct that after the first exchange in an action sequence (when awarding of owe list is made), you can strike your name from owe list in that same action sequence to use in the 2rd and 3rd exchanges (if it goes that far)? 

Far Reaching - I admit I'm a bit vague on this one, p.20.  The example uses exorcism and spirits, so the core aspect of this Strength being something you could "not normally inflict" is about not normally "in the fiction" (e.g., in this fiction spirits are not normally affected by mundane actions) as opposed to not normally "in the rules"?  It doesn't let you do something the rules say you can't do otherwise (e.g., come into a conflict the rules say you are out of).

If I am right about Far Reaching, then does defining a Far Reaching strength effectively mean also indirectly defining an aspect of the game reality.  Without Exorcism defined as ability to counter possession, which you otherwise can't, it's not clear that anyone couldn't try to drive out a spirit.  Defining something as Far Reaching is a way of saying, "in this game, you can only do that thing with a Strength that says so".

One further point, using the p.20 text, Possession itself as a form of attack by a spirit seems a candidate for a Strength, with the Far Reaching benefit since "taking control of another" in that way would usually be "beyond what you can normally inflict".

Rob
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lumpley
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« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2008, 07:55:53 AM »

1. Yes.

2. Yes. A nice, easy example is a network of spies and agents - it's far-reaching because you can act through it in places that you aren't.

Notice that if a demon goes to possess someone, they both totally roll dice over it, but someone standing nearby doesn't. With exorcism, someone standing nearby does get to roll dice - just like with a network of spies and agents you get to roll dice in a fight on a city street even though your character is up in her palace.

3. I wouldn't recommend that you draw any attention to this in play. It just happens, no need to attend to it.

4. The corresponding subtlety here is that, by not making it a particular strength, we've established that it's something that spirits can normally do. Again, I wouldn't pay any explicit attention to this in play, just go with it.

-Vincent
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Valvorik
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Posts: 114


« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2008, 11:48:48 AM »

Thanks.

re #2, this simply allows you "in the fiction" to act via your network, agents, followers, fanatics etc., but you are still "in a conflict" you can be "exhausted" etc. if you lose representing effects on your network or on you yourself (reviewing reports of the failed attack is so depressing etc.).  Nobody can be in a direct conflict within another without being at risk.
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lumpley
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« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2008, 01:33:58 PM »

Yes indeed.

It's also a good opportunity to negotiate badness for the particular strength itself: "I don't see me being exhausted or injured, how about I lose my network of spies for the rest of the chapter?" "Okay."

-Vincent
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