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Author Topic: [IaWA] describing injury and exhaustion  (Read 6962 times)
jenskot
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« on: May 02, 2008, 05:40:40 AM »

Who describes the effects of injury and exhaustion?

Is it:

- the Challenger
- the Answerer
- the person who took the damage
- the person who dealt the damage
- the person who chose damage over negotiation
- the person who wanted negotiation but the other person chose damage

I believe this is another factor that once clarified will greatly improve our play. In play, since no one was sure who has authority over describing how someone was injured or exhausted, the descriptions were fairly weak as no one wanted to make strong statements out of uncertainty or fear of stepping on anyone toes. I believe once it is clear who has final authority over the color of being injured or exhausted, it could add a great deal of tension and fear of taking damage as it will no longer be a numerical effect but rather, "what do you mean you rip my ears off... fuck that, take the god damn ring!"

Hahahahaha.

Rock,
John
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lumpley
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2008, 06:58:30 AM »

Generally, the person who dealt the damage and the GM together.

Strictly speaking, anybody can.

However, the GM, as overseer general, is responsible for making sure that injury descriptions are bloody and bone-crunching enough, and exhaustion descriptions are grueling enough. As GM, you should a) make sure that the person who dealt the damage has full input, even if someone else does the actual describing, then b) make sure that someone actually does describe it, and c) whoever that is, provoke them to details until they've described something genuinely injuring or exhausting.

This is basically just the description rule! When you're called upon to describe something, do (in this case, that means don't fall short of it), and say what's obvious to you plus a detail.

-Vincent
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jenskot
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2008, 11:43:51 AM »

Awesome!

I think the winner controlling the color details of damage (with GM overseeing) and the Answerer controlling the color details of advantage and circumstance can definitely lead to tense negotiations.

Continuing my thought process from here...

- Challenger: wins final action roll.
- Answerer: "I run away with the ring but you catch up to me and kick the crap out of me."
- Challenger: "give me the fucking ring [negotiation] or I'll rip your ears off [injure]."
- Answerer: "but the ring means everything to me..."
- Challenger: "great, I start ripping your ears off... how does that feel fucker???"
- Answerer: "aHHHhhhRRRrrr, take the damn ring!!!!!!!"

Rock,
John
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lumpley
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2008, 02:09:33 PM »

YES.

I probably should have used this word in the text: permanently. The winner can permanently exhaust or permanently injure the loser. Chop off his hand, tear off his ear, break his heart, break his will. Describe it.

-Vincent
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jenskot
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2008, 02:58:18 PM »

For me, that changes... EVERYTHING!

Me = excited!
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