*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 31, 2014, 11:19:39 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
46709 Posts in 5588 Topics by 13297 Members Latest Member: - Shane786 Most online today: 39 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: [In a Wicked Age] Help me understand dice matching  (Read 2194 times)
hix
Member

Posts: 568

Steve Hickey


« on: February 19, 2008, 10:22:15 PM »

I'm enjoying reading through the game, but the "Dice, Action & Consequences" chapter still baffles me after several readings.

My basic confusion is whether the person who is answering compares one die or a total of all their dice to the person they're trying to match.

To take the example on page 14:

"If your higher die doubles my 9..." makes it pretty obvious that you compare your highest die to the opposition's.

"If your dice match mine or better..." implies that you add all of your dice together and compare them to the opposition's highest die.

"If your dice don't match mine..." implies that you add all of your dice together and compare them to the opposition's highest die.

"If your higher die is half mine or less..." makes it pretty obvious that you compare your highest die to the opposition's.

I'd appreciate your help in understanding this.
Logged

Cheers,
Steve

Find out more about Left Coast (a game about writers, inspired by the life of Philip K. Dick) on Twitter: @leftcoastrpg
Moreno R.
Member

Posts: 547


« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2008, 10:41:01 PM »

When there are no advantage dice in the roll, you compare the highest rolled die to the highest rolled die, and if they are tied you compare then the lowest dices

When advantage dice (the d6 with pips) are in the roll, they are added to the highest rolled die, and then the sum is compared to the highest rolled die (or the highest rolled die + advantage die) of the opponent. If they are tied, you compare then the lowest dice (without adding the advantage dice already rolled)

When the book says "If your dice match mine or better", I think it's because you don't throw away the lowest die after you roll. It's the COMPLETE roll that is matched using the rules above) to the complete roll of your opponent. Sometimes the lowest die counts, sometime not.
Logged

Ciao,
Moreno.

(Excuse my errors, English is not my native language. I'm Italian.)
Alan
Member

Posts: 1012


WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2008, 02:15:07 AM »

Steve,

Normally you roll 2 dice and compare the highest from each roll. A particular strength may provide a third die to choose from. Advantage dice add only to the highest single die.

So if you roll 10,1 and I roll 5,5 we only compare the 10 and the 5 and you've doubled me.

If you roll 8,1 and I roll 8,2 then we use the second (and sometimes third) die to break the tie.

When there's a tie for high die, I find it useful to think in terms of powers of ten. I roll 10,5 and you roll 10,6 we're comparing 105 to 106. If I had an advantage die and rolled 7+3,5 and you roll 10, 6 that still works out to 105 to 106.

Logged

- Alan

A Writer's Blog: http://www.alanbarclay.com
Lance D. Allen
Member

Posts: 1970


WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2008, 06:21:47 AM »

Quote
When there's a tie for high die, I find it useful to think in terms of powers of ten. I roll 10,5 and you roll 10,6 we're comparing 105 to 106. If I had an advantage die and rolled 7+3,5 and you roll 10, 6 that still works out to 105 to 106.

Alan,

That is an imminently practical way to look at it. I'm pretty sure I understood it from earlier play and examples, but this crystalizes my understanding.
Logged

~Lance Allen
Wolves Den Publishing
Eternally Incipient Publisher of Mage Blade, ReCoil and Rats in the Walls
lumpley
Administrator
Member
*
Posts: 3656


WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2008, 06:41:55 AM »

Yep.

-Vincent
Logged
hix
Member

Posts: 568

Steve Hickey


« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2008, 10:24:02 PM »

Thanks guys, your answers have been helpful and I think they've helped me locate the source of my confusion.

Quote
I roll 10,5 and you roll 10,6 we're comparing 105 to 106.

Once the second die comes into play, is the person who rolled 10,5 trying to double 16 (the total of the two dice), 10 (the highest die), or 6 (the lowest die)?
Logged

Cheers,
Steve

Find out more about Left Coast (a game about writers, inspired by the life of Philip K. Dick) on Twitter: @leftcoastrpg
Alan
Member

Posts: 1012


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2008, 12:16:28 AM »

You have to double the highest die. If that ties, there's no chance of doubling anything.
Logged

- Alan

A Writer's Blog: http://www.alanbarclay.com
lumpley
Administrator
Member
*
Posts: 3656


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2008, 07:15:19 AM »

Check the first section on page 16. You want your high die to double my high die, low dice irrelevant.

On page 23, I'm going to add a new first item to the "when you compare dice" list: compare high dice; use low dice only to break ties.

-Vincent
Logged
hix
Member

Posts: 568

Steve Hickey


« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2008, 10:28:25 PM »

Thanks everyone for your patient responses.

Vincent, I think that change clarifies things.

I'm also wondering if there's potentially a clearer way of phrasing the 'When you compare dice' instructions.  For instance, on page 14 (in the 'Your answer' section) does a phrasing like this capture your intention better?

Quote
"If your highest die matches mine my highest die or better, but not by double, then Amek takes the advantage,..."



Alan, I thought this was an excellent observation.

Quote
You have to double the highest die. If that ties, there's no chance of doubling anything. 

It took me a night of physically rolling a whole bunch of different pairs of dice to figure out the truth of that.
Logged

Cheers,
Steve

Find out more about Left Coast (a game about writers, inspired by the life of Philip K. Dick) on Twitter: @leftcoastrpg
Pages: [1]
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.16 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines
Oxygen design by Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!