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46709 Posts in 5588 Topics by 13297 Members Latest Member: - Shane786 Most online today: 32 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: The most important thing I've learned  (Read 5526 times)
Rafu
Member

Posts: 64

Raffaele, from Italy


WWW
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2012, 01:16:14 PM »

"This thing I'm doing" which is such a big part of my life can be serious stuff for grownups, fully worth the effort I'm putting into it, and not merely a self-serving escape into my childhood memories.
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Raffaele Manzo, or "Rafu" for short. From (and in) Italy. Here's where I blog about games (English posts). Here's where I micro-blog about everything.
jburneko
Member

Posts: 1429


« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2012, 01:42:29 PM »

Meaning in a story is an audience's interpretation of action and consequence, not a calculated message delivered from on-high.

Jesse
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Graham W
Member

Posts: 449


WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2012, 03:39:41 PM »

On reflection, the most important thing I've learned is how to spot Narrativist games. I can now tell a Narrativist game simply through flicking through it.

My own group are Narrativists, except for one person who is a Gamist, so we like Narrativist games the best. I am really glad the Forge produced so many Narrativist games and did so much to promote Narrativism as opposed to Gamist games like Dungeons and Dragons.
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Nathan P.
Member

Posts: 590

emotional game design


WWW
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2012, 03:45:17 PM »

I can do it, to!

(much love)
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Nathan P.
--
Find Annalise
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I design | ndp design
I blog | Games, Design & Game Design
I tweet | @ndpaoletta
Larry L.
Member

Posts: 639

aka Miskatonic


« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2012, 04:48:33 PM »

The results you are likely to attain are shaped by the system you used to produce them. If you are consistently dissatisfied with the results that seem to keep happening, re-evaluate the system you are using to produce them. None of this will take away from spontaneity or joyful unpredictability. It's true in every other social endeavor human beings participate in, and it's true in gaming.
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