*
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 26, 2014, 03:16:21 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Forum changes: Editing of posts has been turned off until further notice.
Search:     Advanced search
46709 Posts in 5588 Topics by 13297 Members Latest Member: - Shane786 Most online today: 132 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]
Print
Author Topic: [DFRPG] Occult Toronto  (Read 14467 times)
Josh Porter
Member

Posts: 58

I want to be old.


« Reply #60 on: August 22, 2011, 11:35:10 AM »


    • Working with Compells

    What I really want to do is employ the setting/scenario/Compelling mechanics AS WRITTEN and examine their efficacy.
    I am running a DFRPG game set in Portland, and I must say that compels are the most difficult aspect (no pun) of the game for me to use effectively.  It may be that my players have such nebulous aspects that compels don't spring to mind, but I have my doubts.  I forget about compels until there is something I feel would be fun in the moment, but then I can't find an applicable aspect to compel.

    "I want you to fall off the fence instead of rolling for it.  Could 'Pawn Ascending' work for that?  You are 'ascending' the fence, but you fall because you are merely a pawn in the grand scheme of things?"

    Therein lies the difficulty of compels to me.  I can't decide if it's poorly-chosen aspects or my GMing that is making it hard to use effectively.
     
    Logged

    I am playtesting Flawed and Caterpillar.
    I am playing Dresden Files.
    Erik Weissengruber
    Member

    Posts: 601

    Designing "In this Sign, Conquer:


    WWW
    « Reply #61 on: September 13, 2011, 11:46:56 AM »

    >>>  I am running a DFRPG game set in Portland, and I must say that compels are the most difficult aspect (no pun) of the game for me to use effectively.  It may be that my players have such nebulous aspects that compels don't spring to mind, but I have my doubts.  I forget about compels until there is something I feel would be fun in the moment, but then I can't find an applicable aspect to compel.

    The scenario creation mechanics allow you to kind of set up what aspects will show up.  I tried to set up NPCs keyed to or involved with the selected aspects.  If I come back to the game, I will approach each Aspect with challenges in mind like "And what's that about?" or "Are you still sure about that?" or "Are you STILL sure about this?"

    I will keep hammering on players to make sure that they have Aspects that I am interested in.


    >>>  "I want you to fall off the fence instead of rolling for it.  Could 'Pawn Ascending' work for that?  You are 'ascending' the fence, but you fall because you are merely a pawn in the grand scheme of things?"

    I should follow the book more closely in future: if there is an Aspect for which I cannot see a positive interpretation, a negative interpretation, and a potential compel, I will ask for a rewrite.

    Therein lies the difficulty of compels to me.  I can't decide if it's poorly-chosen aspects or my GMing that is making it hard to use effectively.
    Logged
    Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]
    Print
    Jump to:  

    Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.16 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines
    Oxygen design by Bloc
    Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!