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46709 Posts in 5588 Topics by 13297 Members Latest Member: - Shane786 Most online today: 32 - most online ever: 429 (November 03, 2007, 04:35:43 AM)
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Author Topic: [Game Chef 2011] The Trouble with Rose  (Read 23300 times)
zircher
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« on: July 15, 2011, 12:02:54 PM »

Sigh, Rose has done it again and her father can stand it no more.  As Rose's closest friends, can you comfort her, mend the damage, and perhaps pursue your own agenda?
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TAZ
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zircher
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 03:49:05 PM »

Started brain storming, mixing components into a witch's brew and spoon feeding it to Google.  It said, "Here is the Shakespeare play that you have never whose main character matches what you wanted to create down to the name.  Would you like to read the manga?"

My brain 'sploded.  :-)
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zircher
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2011, 03:54:32 PM »

...never seen....   How the heck do you edit posts on the Forge? 

Perfect is not the pen that I hold.
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TAZ
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Hans Chung-Otterson
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2011, 04:15:42 PM »

You can't edit posts on the Forge. The idea of that kind of bent my brain at first, but I've come to appreciate it.

...and what play are you talking about?
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zircher
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Have gun. Will travel.


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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2011, 04:53:50 PM »

As You Like It, I actually had a list of alternate ingredients that I wanted to include for theme reasons like romantic comedy, love triangle, Rose, etc.  Google said, "Here's a story about a daughter named Rose (Rosalind) that has been exiled."  Cool.  :-)
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WPTunes
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« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2011, 06:09:43 PM »

You can't edit posts on the Forge. The idea of that kind of bent my brain at first, but I've come to appreciate it.

I quite like that there's a button for a marquee tag.
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Jonathan Walton
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2011, 07:48:21 PM »

Rosalind is one of my favorite Shakespearean heroines.  Her epilogue is badass.
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devlin1
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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2011, 08:40:02 PM »

Rosalind is one of my favorite Shakespearean heroines.  Her epilogue is badass.
Indeed. I think she'll be popping up in one form or another in quite a few submissions.
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--Mike Olson
zircher
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Have gun. Will travel.


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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2011, 03:27:18 PM »

More brain storming...

Rose is an NPC around which the story session revolves.  While she could be in every scene, it is not a requirement since it is quite possible that some players at the table may be plotting behind her back.  (Tis better this way my dear rose.)  The setting can be historical, fantasy, modern, or futuristic, the troupe decides this beforehand.  It's even possible that Rose may be a Rosalind, a Gypsy Rose, or a Rose by any other name.

After the setting is determined, the nature of her crime or banishment must be worked out.  Traditionally, the father exiles the daughter, but this can also vary with the story that the troupe wants to tell.  Perhaps she's fleeing a crime, escaping an arranged marriage, searching for her lost brother against the wishes of her father.

After the setting for the session has been determined, the players create the characters which are the friends of Rose.  However, each player is dealt a card face down and this is their secret agenda.  Hearts means that the player is secretly in love with Rose, diamonds mean that you're in it for the money, clubs charges you with defending and protecting Rose, and a spade means that you're secretly working for her down fall (whether out of jealousy, scorn, or perhaps on her father's orders.)
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TAZ
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Nathan P.
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emotional game design


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« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2011, 05:56:03 AM »

I like where this is going.

That is all.
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Nathan P.
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I design | ndp design
I blog | Games, Design & Game Design
I tweet | @ndpaoletta
zircher
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2011, 02:23:57 PM »

Thanks, I've got some other play mechanics worked out in my head, but still mulling over 'scoring' since I'd like to keep this GMless if possible.  I think it would be a hoot if the 'winner' of the session got to write the epilog and wrap up the story that was told.
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TAZ
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zircher
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Have gun. Will travel.


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« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2011, 04:16:30 PM »

Since I'm not a game design pro, I thought I'd grab a little Jeepform action and see what happens.  Hopefully that will help me to gel some of my design bits that I have in my head.  Of course, anyone is welcome to copy these Jeep Truths and seek your own answers for your Game Chef entries.

from http://jeepen.org/dict/...

Jeep Truths, for Gamewrights and Game Masters

1.Restrictions foster creativity.
The brain storm/setting creation session at the beginning of play sets the main players and world in motion.  A dark fantasy setting would preclude space ships and androids.  Determine Rose's troubles and you offer a path for solutions and twists.  Also, when a character plays their hand, their natures and forsworn weakness are the elements they mush use to advance the story.

2.You basically cannot go wrong by letting people succeed (which doesn't necessitate doing so).
A player's hand tells them what but now how, success is a measure of using what you have been dealt even if it a negative trait.  They can choose their own level of success and there is a strategy in that when combined with your fate/secret agenda.

3.You should always have a message or premise. If you ask yourself "What is this game about?" and find yourself answering with long description of how you think it will be played think again.
The Trouble with Rose is about players colaborating to tell a 'Shakespearean' tale of romance and betrayal.

4.Setting does not make up for story. Assume that you are the only one that thinks your setting is cool.
Given that the players can pick a setting from a list or create their own, I hope to avoid this pitfall while still presenting an interesting game to play.  The play is the thing, even character creation is part of the world building.

5.Assume your players can handle difficult form.
Indeed, in resolving their hand, the player is wide open to assemble and describe the scene as long as it is not vetoed.

6.Assume your players can understand complex stories.
By it's very nature, the players are creating a complex story in five parts.  Nature, forsworn aspects, and their secret agendas will drive them to tell a twisted tale and thwart their opponents while moving the story forward.

7.Assume your players are interested and motivated to do the best possible thing with your game.
Part of the design is that the players will hopefully be motivated since they will have buy in during setting and scene creation.

8.A game that stinks should be ended quickly, and then discussed.
I agree, and if words permit, there will be a section in the game design notes for that.  I've already tasked some of my friends to help me play test this and see if there are any pit falls I may be able to avoid.

9.A story can often benefit from having less lead characters than actual characters. There is no rule that says everyone should have equal direct impact on the story or equal screen-time.
Interestingly enough, there is only one 'lead' character.  Rose is an NPC that is controlled by all the players at the table.  Players have the power to bring in second characters and even exclude Rose from the spot light.  This is a common story element used by Shakespeare.

10.Shorter games are often better than longer; it is okay to end a game after three hours (or less), even if you've, publicly, estimated the time to six.
Playtesting will hopefully give me a better feel for the duration of the game.  The intention is to create a table top game that can be played in one sitting while still creating a five act 'play'.

11.Always make sure that the players know what they are playing, and where the story should be going.
Between setting creation, character creation, and their secret agenda, players will have their direction.  But, no plan survives contact with Rose and her friends.  Twists and turns are to be meat and potatoes of game play as the players seek to guide the story to their favor.

12.A game can be played several times with the same players playing the same characters.
Replayability for The Trouble with Rose should be extremely high since even the very nature of Rose and her exile can change from game to game.  On the other hand, you can use a pre-determined setting and pre-gen characters to jump start a game which can still be played uniquely.

13.Keeping player number low and keeping players close together, such as in the same room, enables you to do cooler things with the form, helps keeping a unified vision and facilitates telegraphing.
The game is round robin story telling with a tale that builds on each twist.

14.The most important purpose of a story is to facilitate player interaction.
While characters can be pulled into a scene, the main interaction is going to be how to play off of the action of the other characters and perhaps to guess their secret agenda and either work towards that or as a foil.

15.Don't be afraid of patch-work stories.
(Laughing out loud) I'm counting on it!
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TAZ
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Vulpinoid
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« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2011, 04:39:28 PM »

I was actually reading your post here as you were writing your response to my post over on Praxis.

It'll be interesting to compare our final products.
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A.K.A. Michael Wenman
Vulpinoid Studios The Eighth Sea now available for as a pdf for $1.
zircher
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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2011, 04:42:55 PM »

Aye, we're certainly on the same wavelength.  :-)
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zircher
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« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2011, 01:54:16 PM »

Gah!  My appendix for expanded setting descriptions is 891 words.  Yeah, started working on the text at the front and the back.  Rules up front and the appendix following.

I see the Grim Reaper's editting pen in my future.  :-)
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TAZ
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